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20121027
20121104
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Search Results 0 to 49 of about 52 (some duplicates have been removed)
happened here, where so many experts in the field of environmental science have suggested that what is happening with these severe weather systems is becoming more frequent, as a result of climate change? >> well, martin, governor romney hasn't said a whole lot about a lot of things recently. you know, folks asked him 14 times yesterday, whether he was going to -- whether he wanted to get rid of fema. the last thing he heard or the last thing i remember hearing from governor romney on climate change was, he was questioning the science of climate change. and this is the same person who, when he was governor the first two years, was one of the leaders of reggie, the state consortium of governors, who wanted to do something about greenhouse gas emissions. two years later, he pulls out of it, as he was ramping up his run for president, the first run for president in 2008. so i think, you just -- he's been on every side of this issue, so the latest incarnation is that governor romney has questioned the science behind climate change. >> but also, john, i remember mr. romney's speech at th
that you can. so, we use those kinds of principles that are basically at the heart of a lot of science to be able to do this somewhat miraculous feet producing an accurate representation by just talking with a small fraction. host: are they accurate? guest: well, they are. polling has a very good track record of accurately predicting the elections even though that is not our main purpose. is one way we can know that polls are accurate. in fact, of all the surveys that are done it is one of the only ones that has a very clear outside way to validate all the polsters including the pew will do a final poll and put the estimates out the next week or so before the election and on election day we will find out how accurate we were. four years ago we were within one point of picking the exact mark. eight years ago we were dead on the margin. and we are not the only ones that have a good track record. most polling does a very good job of predicting how the election will turn out. host: how do you a do a poll from the beginning to the end? guest: it is a fairly straightforward process. we do se
] [ crowd chants u.s.a. ] >> cenk: i love that reaction. hey, what about climate science? u.s.a.! u.s.a.! we're number one! ha ha, take that, climate change. luckily, not everybody's that dense. new cover of business week is it's global warming stupid. we now have the author of that article, assistant managing editor of bloomberg business week joining us now. some believe this cover story is a bit controversial. do you believe it is? >> no, obviously the cover language is meant to get people's attention but if you read the story itself, you see we're playing it right down the middle. the issue here is not to blame climate change for any one particular storm but to say that the conditions in the atmosphere have indisputably changed and as a result of those changes, all storms generally speaking are going to be prone to be more severe and more frequent and we are beginning to see in undeniable terms the price of the warming of the atmosphere, the warming of the ocean waters and the rise of the ocean waters. >> cenk: paul, here's the problem with that. you say it's undeniable, all the scientist
and being ready, no matter what happens, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense, from td ameritrade. which isn't rocket science. so i test... a lot. do you test with this? freestyle lite test strips? i don't see... beep! wow! that didn't take much blood. yeah, and the unique zipwik tab targets the blood and pulls it in. so easy. yep. freestyle lite needs just a third the blood of onetouch ultra. really? so testing is one less thing i have to worry about today. great. call or click today and get strips and a meter free. test easy. >>> paul ryan is running for vice president of the united states. why is the man running for president of the united states sending his running mate to places in the united states where the people who are going to decide the election cannot see him? that's ahead. zeebox is the free app that makes tv even better. if your tv were a prom queen, zeebox would be a stretch limo. with this enchanting union, comes a sunroof she can scream from... i'm goin' to prom! [ male announcer ] ...and a driver named bruce that she can re-name james... faster, james
question is turnout, that and rational self-interest. the young who believe in science, women who believe in protecting their rights, latinos who can see a brighter future with a supportive president all need to get out, show up, and vote. there's no reward for a failure. in a free society, a democratic society is a failure, deeply personal, you blew it if you don't vote. let's see where it stands. i'm joined by mother jones washington bureau chief david corn and joy reid. do you think i'm a little strong? >> no. >> i don't want to talk to anybody after this election if they haven't bothered to vote. with four days to go, president obama and mitt romney made their closing arguments today at multiple stops in ohio and wisconsin. take a look at some of the sights and sounds from this day of campaigning. ♪ >> in this campaign he's tried as hard as he can to repackage, to repackage these same policies and offer them up as change. >> do you want more of the same or do you want real change? >> giving more power back to the biggest banks, that's not change. >> and we need real change. >> anoth
financial crisis. he has worked to develop new systems and data visualization tools with social science analysis. his writing has appeared in "the wall street journal." it is my pleasure to welcome to the state chair dr. kim. [applause] >> take you for your kind introduction. but the korean economic institute is honored to be a co- sponsor of this panel of the united states current and past assistant secretaries of state for east asian affairs. i can think of no better partners than the amend school of foreign services and the president and georgetown university to share this platform to explore the future of the united states policies in the asia-pacific. i think that that 21st century will be seen as the asia-pacific century. much of the economic dynamism and grit will emerge from this region. many of the toughest gruel challenges as well. the rise of china, the prospects of asian economic integration, and the scurvy problems on the korean peninsula. u.s. leadership and continuous engagement in this region will be critical in these and many more issues ahead. as the president of the e
the market is doing and being ready, no matter what happens, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense, from td ameritrade. >>> just before halloween last year was a giant snowstorm in the northeast. kind of ruined trick or treating and it turned out to be the only real snow we got all year. basically it sucked. this year we're anticipating another big weather event right before halloween and it's actually looking like it might be a big enough weather event it might mess with another big national thing a week after halloween and that's something you might have heard of called election day. halloween is wednesday and election day is the tuesday after that. forecasters at the national weather service have taken to calling what is upon us a frankenstorm. it's a come by niegs combination of a few things. it's a hurricane. but hurricane sandy combines with a winter storm coming out of the west and that combines further with a blast of arctic air. a storm or a storm system or combination of storm systems that's potentially this significant is always of national significance. but the fr
, favors republicans. this is not rocket science. to the extent that voting in florida is a debacle, it's one made by design. the ballot in florida is ten pages long. and with fewer days to vote, you get really long lines. but that's the way it goes in florida now. leading up to the election, florida republicans cut the time for early voting in half. so now floridians stand in long lines. they pass new restriction on registering voters so thousands fewer new voters signed up. and the governor has tried to purge the voter rolls. in south florida and palm beach county, 30,000 ballots were printed wrong. clerks have been copying what the voters marked on to new ballots that can fit into the tabula tabulating machines. dozens asked for absentee ball the lots and still haven't gotten them because they screwed up the ballots. the situation is worse in broward county where people have waited for weeks for absentee ballots. you can say that florida's election is another debacle in the making were it not already a debacle right now. and it is. joining us is joy reid. she's an msnbc contributor w
takes a look at the science, yes, there's a science, of shopping with some consumer dos and don'ts. good morning. >> good morning. >> is there really a science to shopping for big-ticket items? >> there really is. we have a new experiment out of brigham young university and emery university and it says if you are shopping for a big item like a big screen tv, you should not focus on the price. people who focused on the price actually spent 50% more, because you're just thinking about the dollars. you're much better off thinking about what attributes do i want this product to have? whether it's a diamond ring, whether it's a big screen tv, how big do i want it to be? what kind of resolution do i want it to have? do you want it to be a smart tv? and then you can find the one that has all of those attributes at a lower price. >> it seems like the things with the best of those attributes would have the biggest price. is that true? >> that's not always true especially in an item like big screen tvs where we're seeing a lot of them under $10,000. >> we'll start with popular books and something
keep being climate change designers and anti-science in a variety of ways. >> anti-science, we are still dealing with 46 million people on food stamps. we are still dealing with a 50% increase in the national debt and 100% increase in the gasoline price. now, in new jersey, they can only get 10 gallons. we are dealing with a lot of economic problems. >> part of what sandy tells us, yes, we are dealing with all of those things. that's not somehow separate about trying to get a laugh line by talking about the rising ocean. >> everybody wants to see c-130s unloading electric trucks to help them. they expect the government to show up. it is what level the government takes irresponsibilities. not enough time to see what this storm has done. >> if we keep thinking of government's response as only about response after the fact rather than thinking about the money that is saved and the policies and the fairness associated with doing disaster planning through fair governorer nance in the first place. >> you are talking about wanting a cop to do on the job. what melissa is talking about
, virginia, yesterday. joining us is melissa harris perry. professor of political science at tulane university. she's a columnist for the nation and host of the melissa harris perry show here on msnbc. thank you for being here. >> absolutely. >> is there a hermetically sealed bubble around presidential elections or does what happens in these swing states reflect not just the presidential election but what has happened politically in those states since '08? >> i think the story you told about virginia going blue, and a story we didn't tell quite enough on election night in 2008. in part, because like ten minutes later we called the west coast and it was over. >> then the election was over. >> so no one really paused it to take note of it. but that transition is indicative of sort of how much virginia has changed as a place. it's always been a border state. it's always quite different in northern virginia than somewhere else. but the fact is that the fights that we have seen there over the course of the past four years is a shifting back and forth of the republican control and then th
don't respond to hard-line phone calls. or just the science of polling. >> or the number of times i have refused to pick up my phone when i can see it's research firm. but, nonetheless, i think a nightmare frankly, maybe we can all agree on this, is that there are some electoral college/popular vote difference. >> one scenario is that it just doesn't come down to one state, like ohio, is that you got four, or five, states and each one of those five is in that circumstance and then we're in total confusion. >> we have december 31st coming up. not like all the time in the world to make these decisions. >> you talk about ohio, they don't even count all of the absentee votes in ohio until november 16th. it will take longer than that for the provisional votes. andrew, you talked about polls. last time around, our abc news/washington post had president obama's number dead-on. 53%. now romney at 49%. talk about the possibility that governor romney wins the popular vote and loses the electoral college. >> this is our 57th presidential election. in 52 at least, the popular vote and the elect
in the prestigious journal cycle science, americans are happier when national wealth is distributed more evenly than when it is distributed unevenly. that's why hurricane sandy isn't a distraction from this election. it's actually at the heart of it. it's about the kind of society that we wish to imagine for ourselves. and here is how the president described it just an hour ago as he visited the red cross. >> during the darkness of the storm, i think we also saw what's brightest in america. nurses at nyu hospital carrying fragile newborns to safety. we've seen incredibly brave firefighters in queens waist-deep in water battling interknoi infern rn
, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. with thermacare heatwraps. thermacare works differently. it's the only wrap with patented heat cells that penetrate deep to relax, soothe, and unlock tight muscles. for up to 16 hours of relief, try thermacare. >>> disasters are inherently political because government is political. and preventing and responding to disasters is a primary role of the state. right. and while a lot of politics have suddenly become irrelevant in the context of this crisis, it seems important there's stark contrast between the presidential candidates in terms of how they think a government should respond to a disaster. we know what president obama's stance is on the matter because we have been watching him act on it now in realtime. in this crisis he has faced as president. mitt romney has argued that he essentially doesn't want a federal government role in disaster response. he made these remarks on the subject at a debate last year saying not only should we get rid of federal disaster response but it should be taken over by privat
first day of work to his last, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. >>> from bipartisan leadership at work to the late night comics back at play, here are today's "top lines" heck of a job brownie. >> i instituted a 15-minute rule. you return everybody's phone calls in 15 minutes. >> we want to make sure they have a speedy and fik recovery from their financial and in many cases personal loss. >> how long? >> 1996. >> i cannot thank the president enough. >> governor christie has been responsive, aggressive. >> is it wrong for one man to love another man? >> chris christie kicked crazy [ bleep ]. >> good thing his mom sewed his name into all of his clothes. >> somebody put into the sand the letters romney. >> why? >> because they love him. >> the differences between the two men are very dramatic and without a doubt only one of them is a leader. >> i'm a guy who does his job. you must be the other guy. >> he scrapped his victory rally in kettering, ohio, and appeared at a completely different the same spot and called it a storm relief rally. >> michael
-interest. the young who believe in science, women who believe in protecting their rights, latinos who can see a brighter future with a supportive president all need to get out, show up, and vote. there's no reward for a failure. in a free society, a democratic society is a failure. deeply personal, you blew it if you don't vote. let's see where it stands. i'm joined by mother jones washington bureau chief david corn and joy reid. do you think i'm a little strong? >> no. >> i don't want to talk to anybody after this election if they haven't bothered to vote. with four days to go president obama and mitt romney made their closing arguments today at multiple stops in ohio and wisconsin. take a look at some of the sights and sounds from this day of campaigning. ♪ >> in this campaign he's tried as hard as he can to repackage, to repackage these same policies and offer them up as change. >> do you want more of the same or do you want real change? >> giving more power back to the biggest banks, that's not change. >> and we need real change. >> another $5 trillion tax cut that favors the wealthy, t
they are to vote. high turnout favors democrats. low turnout favors republicans. this is not rocket science. to the extent that voting in florida this year is a debacle, it is a man-made debacle. it is a debacle by design. in some towns the ballot this year in florida is ten pages long. and filling it out takes longer, and with fewer days to vote, well, yeah, magic, you get really long lines. but that's the way it goes in florida now. leading up to the election, florida republicans cut the time for early voting in half. so now floridians stand in long lines. they pass new restriction on registering voters so thousands fewer new voters signed up. and governor scott has continued trying to purge the voter rolls in florida, challenging voter registrations in to the final weeks before the vote. in south florida and palm beach county 30,000 absentee ballots were printed wrong. clerks have been copying what the voters marked on to new ballots that can fit into the tabulating machines. dozens more voters asked for absentee ballots and still haven't gotten them, days much about the election. becaus
esdridge is a professor of law and political science at usc and fox news contributor. good to see you. >> good to see you, art. >> arthel: so they're giving the closing arguments. are these closing arguments really important, susan? too they resonate with that undecided voter? >> well, the funny part is by now what's really important is getting your vote out. in a funny way, all these rallies, actually or problem, if you were on the ground, as i've been many times trying to get that vote out, having to build a rally, it's sort of a distraction. so ultimately what the candidates need to do, they're doing this to chin up the base, generate excitement so their supporters will feel like yes, yes, we can do it. but basically at the very end what the candidates have to do, art issues is just get out of the way so the ground game can play its way up. >> arthel: do you think they should tailor those messages to those individual states? >> well, they're hop scotching because every time you land in a state, you get some local news coverage. usually what you do in these last days is you get on t
at the science of shopping with consumer dos and don'ts. >> dpoork. >> is there really a science to shopping for big-ticket items. >> a new study out of brigham young university and emorie university, if you're shopping for a big-ticket item like a big-screen tv, you shouldn't focus on the price. people who did spent 50% more. you're much better off thinking about what attributes do i want this product to have, whether it's a diamond ring or a big-screen tv, how big do i want it to be? what kind of resolution do i need it to have? do i want it to be a smart tv and then you can find one of those with all those attributes at the lowest price, works better. >> seems like the best of those things with those attributes would have the biggest price, is that necessarily true? >> not necessarily in items like big-korean tvs where we're seeing a lot of them under $1,000. >> let's talk about how to go about it. starting with popular books and something you call save on where we get great deals. >> we're going to break you some great deals. these come from retail me not and led us to those deals. the f
. others say it is pretty unusual. i was wondering what the record and science say about the but secular course this storm is taking. >> what makes every storm unique is a combination of things, the time of year, strength of the structure in magnitude and size. sandy is unique in a number of ways. it is certainly not common for a system to come in at this strength. but if you look back in history, tropical cyclones have come up the east coast many times in the past. the whole east coast is vulnerable to storm surges and hurricanes. look at isabel in 2003 that came in a little bit further south and had all the storm surge. it has taken a different path, going it in a different direction than this one is. every storm is unique. this is not 100 percent unprecedented, but certainly not common to have a system of this magnitude coming from this direction at this time of year, and what makes this nearly unprecedented and very unusual is the transition to oppose best tropical cyclone and all the different hazards you have in one time. >> i think this is the only time i know of with the hurrican
and science teachers so high- tech jobs -- math and science teachers so high-tech jobs are not created in china but right here in colorado. we should work with community colleges to train another 2 million americans with the skill businesses are looking for now, and that is part of my plan for the future. that is what changes. that is what is at stake in this election. tohange comes when we live up america's legacy of innovation, where we make america the next home of scientific discovery when technological breakthroughs. i am proud i met on a mirror -- i'd bet on american ingenuity, and we are not just building cars. we are building better cars that will go twice as far on a gallon of gas. [applause] today there are thousands of workers all across the country. not every technology we bet on will pan out. there is a future for clean energy it in america. i am not going to see the future to another country. i want to create jobs here in america. i want to support the new technologies that will reduce carbon who in our atmosphere, that will make us less dependent on foreign oil. that is
day of work to his last, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. (vo) she gets the comedians laughing and the thinkers thinking. >>ok, so there's wiggle room in the ten commandments, that's (vo) she's joy behar. >>current will let me say anything. [ ♪ theme ♪ ] >> announcer: the parting shot with bill press. this is the "bill press show." >> bill: all right. on this tuesday october 30, my parting shot for today. nobody's talking about it anymore but there still is a big election. one week from today. and democrats have to stop panicking every time they see a national tracking poll that shows this election to be a dead heat. first of all, a little reminder, that's not how we elect a president. there is not a national referendum. we elect presidents state by state. and that's looking good for obama. no matter what you think about the electoral college. by "huffington post" count obama has 277 electoral votes to romney's 206. colorado florida virginia and new hampshire are still tossup
this election will look at what went wrong and what went right, after this. it is science and they are very talented people. a lot of times they are very accurate. i will say that, it you are for one candidate or another, there is your own emotions that play into this sometimes, if so you will see a poll that maybe is not favorable to you and your party and sometimes your emotions can play into it. for the most part, particularly with these averages, they are generally accurate. host: we did a segment yesterday about understanding polls during the campaign season. if your interested, go to c- span.org and we have the pew research director talked about how and why polls are done. now to thomas in little home, texas, republican -- in little elm. caller: i want to know, for everyone out there, i know people that go to college, whether their parents paid for it or day paige ford themselves, they're very proud they went to college. i cannot figure out why obama, and his wife, have hidden their records and sealed them. guest: well, i don't want to comment directly on that, necessarily, but i will
of marriage. it is not what got a design. and that is what we focus on is using the social science. what that shows is what society for centuries has followed in the judeo-christian teaching is actually right. if you want to have a successful happy prosperous relationship and the family and marriage, you preserve yourself until marriage, you abstain from sexual relations, you enjoy that married relationship, you produce children, you raise them in that environment where they are loving and there's a commitment between the mother and the father. and expose them to the religious teachings. in the evidence is overwhelming. a better emotionally, educationally, economically. i understand, that is not, everybody has not had that opportunity. and we need to reach an as a community, in particular reaching out and helping those that do not have that benefit. we should never take our policies and change them away from what we should be aspiring to be. and the best environment for a child, bar none, is with their biological mother and father who are in a lifelong marriage relationship, those childr
is there for a specific reason and not in manchester, 20 miles to the north. there is a lot of science to this. there is a lot of polling that goes into it. it is very strategic. we have had a lot of candidates here for the primary. we have had a lot of exposure to them. certainly, voters here are knowledgeable about who these people are after going through the primary. the different debates that go on. host: neil levesque, executive director of the new hampshire institute for politics, thank you. there are four electoral votes at stake in new hampshire, and it is considered a tight race. it's history of being a swing state continues as it is on our list. our conversation continues about the battle states, the battleground state of new hampshire with -- our competition continues about the battleground states of new hampshire. kathy sullivan is the chairwoman of the democratic party. she tried to us from manchester this morning. if i could begin with the "washington post" piece. republicans say that romney's team is far ahead of what senator john mccain had in place for years ago. but the exten
is what happened with that coverup in benghazi. you know, they said early there were no warning science. we have, at this network chronicled between half a dozen and a dozen of them. here another one, looks like a smoking gun a secret cable that said they had this emergency meeting three weeks before those guys were murdered. you know what? the consulate not safe. we should probably go ahead and hide out over at the cia outp away. nobody did anything. >> no, they didn't. there ought to be a pulitzer prize for catherine herridge and jennifer griffin at staff at fox news they have done yo men's work to get the truth out. >> first to say the government lied to us and now they are covering it up. it's becoming more clear every day. clear danger in benghazi. indication that the reason that the ambassador went there really secretly and quietly because he knew it was a treacherous place to be. why we haven't admitted that the only thing you can imagine is that we just don't want to admit that, you know, bin laden may be dead. but al qaeda is very much alive. it's the ambassador who is dead. do
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 52 (some duplicates have been removed)